Clockwise: Salad mix (bagged), garlic chives, bell peppers, beets, kale, red kuri squash, watermelon

Did you know?
That watermelon’s have more lycopene per pound than fresh tomatoes? Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that aids the body in fighting off free radicals. While fresh tomatoes are also an excellent source of lycopene, cooked tomatoes can have up to three times as much. All the more reason to eat watermelon now and jar/can our tomatoes for winter. 🙂

 

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5 thoughts on “What’s Cooking

    • It’s a red kuri winter squash that can store up to 6 months! Supposedly it has a chestnut flavor, and may or may not come from Japan initially. It seems like you can cook it anyway imaginable, and it is high in fiber, vitamins A, C and B, potassium, iron, riboflavin, thiamine and calcium. I am “attempting” to store it for the winter, but it looks so darn good it may not last. I will post when I decided what I’m doing with it… trying to decide between sweet and baked or savory and stuffed. 🙂

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