CSA Double Dose #2

This is supposed to be a vegetable dancer. Hold me closer – veggie dancer.

Last week’s CSA: Yams, peppers, carrots, garlic

This week’s CSA Arugula, Kale, Spinach, Peppers, Garlic. Yummy!

Did you know?

That yams can weigh up to 120 pounds a piece? Yikes!

See How (T)he(i)r Garden Grows…

So, quick post on our garden! Eric is the veggie mastermind, and it is sad that I let this summer go by without documenting our garden. That being said, some pictures to share, and some of the things that I wonder at that we are growing. Cheers! PS: WordPress picture formatting sucks. I’ve been jiggering with it for about 30 minutes now, delaying dinner, and so pictures are out of order and text is whack. My apologies – I hope you enjoy none the less!

The beginning trestles for green, scarlet runner and purple podded yard long beans created by Eric. This was taken a few months ago. See next for now.This is the tripod of green beans on the left in the first photo.

Purple Podded Yard Long Beans for winter drying and storage. Erica from B&H told us to put them in a grain sack, and beat the living daylights out of them for the best way to shell them. That should be a blast! 🙂

A chicken carrying a humungous tomato that was buggy.

Snacking ladies! They love questionable tomatoes.

Today’s harvest – green peppers, yellow bell tomatoes, yellow pear tomatoes, green beans, Czechoslovakian black peppers, poblanos, a lone sparks earliana tomato, and a lone black brandy-wine.

The trellis on the right in the first picture – now with Purple Podded Yard Long Beans to store for winter. Lovely flowers commingling from the Scarlett Runner Beans!

Scarlett Runner flowers. So pretty!

the first picture – taken today.

Clockwise: Salad mix (bagged), garlic chives, bell peppers, beets, kale, red kuri squash, watermelon

Did you know?
That watermelon’s have more lycopene per pound than fresh tomatoes? Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that aids the body in fighting off free radicals. While fresh tomatoes are also an excellent source of lycopene, cooked tomatoes can have up to three times as much. All the more reason to eat watermelon now and jar/can our tomatoes for winter. 🙂

 

Frying Pan Turkey Meatballs

Happy Monday everyone!

So with the ridiculous amount of tomatoes that our plants keep gracing us with, we have been in mega sauce production mode. No sooner had I finished making a wicked large batch of spaghetti sauce, than we yielded another crop of tomatoes and I was left going, OK, more sauce! I wanted meatballs, but I try to reserve my “red meat moments” for my occasional steak. Turkey it was!

Ground turkey can be a hazard unto itself. Because there are not percentages of fat to meat ratio on a number of ground turkey products, you can actually end up eating something MORE unhealthy than an 80/20 ground beef. When buying turkey, look for lean or extra lean meat. I conveniently found a 99% to 1% ratio this time. It was really yummy. Also, you can opt to bake them, but with all of this heat I went for the skillet!

For my sauce recipe, see Kelyn’s Rainbow Tomato Sauce.  This incarnation was more of a roasted red pepper version.

Ingredients

1 lb “all natural” extra lean ground turkey
1 -2 teaspoons chopped, local, organic garlic
1TBSP Fennel seeds
1 extra large egg (from our ladies!)
1/2 cup bread crumbs (unseasoned)
1 tsp organic dry oregano
1 tsp organic dry basil
1 tsp organic dry rosemary
Sea Salt and 4-color pepper to taste
Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1.) Add everything to a bowl. Mix it up with your hands until you can’t see the individual elements anymore.
2.) In a large frying pan, heat up enough oil to lightly cover the bottom of the pan over medium – medium high heat.
3.) While your oil heats up, roll your meatballs. I made them about an inch in diameter. If you try to roll them too hard, they can just fall to pieces. It is best to give a little roll between your palms, and then shape them into circles.
4.) When they are complete, gently place them in the pan. I usually try to “seal” 3 sides  of them, and then just toss them around in the pan every couple of minutes until they are brown on all sides. It took about 20-25 minutes I think (but honestly, I wasn’t hawk-eyeing the clock). I cut into one at about 15-20 minutes and saw that it wasn’t quite done. I let them go another 5 and they were good to go. Serve in sammies or atop your favorite pasta.

Potatoes, Salad Mix, Peppers, Garlic, and of course –  Beets!

Did you know?
Lots of groups like to highlight the best things to buy organically – as in the foods that are treated the most heavily with pesticides. I like to check on the “Dirty Dozen”, which I have listed below for 2012.  Click here for the full list of heavily treated crops.

These are ordered with #1 being the absolute worst. Hence, why I get peppers, lettuce and potatoes as much as possible in our CSA!

1.Apples
2. Celery
3. Sweet Bell Peppers
4.Peaches
5. Strawberries
6. Nectarines – Imported
7. Grapes
8. Spinach
9. Lettuce
10. Cucumbers
11.Blueberries – domestic
12.Potatoes

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